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Current topics (click to view the thoughts in a topic):


This topic is: Are 2-way radios a good idea?

Thoughts in this topic

Name: G
Email: ketchumgreg@hotmail.com
Date: Sun, Sep 30, 2007, 13:10:45
Message:
Yes, absolutely. I like to call into my team every tenth of a mile so that they can plot my progress on the course during each lap. I also radio in everytime I take a sip of fluid or eat food. That way my crew can track my fluid and caloric intake to the second. Our goal is to over-analyze everything and generate as much unnecessary "noise" as possible. I usually call in with an overly dramatic and military "sounding" tone to my voice, to really emphasize the seriousness of this endeavour.

Name: Trapper John
Email: nunyabiniss@yahoo.com
Date: Mon, Sep 17, 2007, 15:27:26
Message:
Isn't it funny to read through these and watch technology progress? JJ's techno speak from 2003 was somewhat correct for that time but so outdated now.

All FRS radios are limited by the FCC on power output. If you get into a race course like Landahl in Missouri you're going to lose reception in about 1/2 mile due to foliage and hills. A tall antenna at a base camp may help but by FCC rule you can't attach any transmission boosters to FRS radios. Rules are meant to be broken though!!

Name: Chris roy
Email: Chrisnroy86@hotmail.com
Date: Tue, Jul 31, 2007, 14:10:41
Message:
Two-ways saved our butts at Killington this year...would def. reccomend them to anyone racing

Name: Carl
Email: cwerntz@wvu.edu
Date: Mon, Jun 06, 2005, 17:48:09
Message:
For Big Bear (2005) my Search and Rescue group will be assisting with course commo and we were out there a few weeks ago surveying the communications along the course. We found coverage difficult. It will not be possible to cover the entire course with simplex (non-repeater) radios, nor is there cell-phone coverage of many parts of the course. However, the last mile or so of the loop should be able to contact the start/finish area reliably. We are setting up an on-site repeater to give up coverage of the entire course for accident response.

Name: J.J. Damnit!!!
Email: jjdamnit@earthlink.net
Date: Tue, Oct 07, 2003, 15:30:02
Message:
A little techno speak.

A cell telephone is a device that enables telephone calls to be sent and received via a wireless connection. In order for a cell phone to work it must be in a cell. A cell is comprised of three or more antennae arranged in a triangular formation, thus creating a cell. If there are no antennae then this type of device will not work.

A walkie-talkie or two-way radio is a line of sight device, with one exception. Depending on the range of the devices being used and the terrain; valleys, mountains, dense forested areas, all pose problems and limit the range of these devices.

The exception to this rule is having radios that use a repeater. A repeater is an antenna with an amplifier of sorts placed on the highest point, and must be in line of sight of the radios. When one radio sends a message to the repeater it repeats the message in a broadcast form to allow other radios, not in the line of site of each other, to receive the message. Repeaters are most often used by police, fire, and search and rescue. These systems use special radios that are tuned to the repeaters frequencies. These systems are usually setup and maintained by the above mentioned organizations and or municipalities.

Most two-way radios that are available to the consumer have a limited reception of only a few miles. These are most effective in flat featureless areas like Moab.

We live in the heart of the Rockies in Colorado at 10,578’ and the radios we use are good for about a mile or two. Further south in the Salida Buena Vista area their range increases to about 5-miles.

Because these are clear channel radios we not only pickup each others transmissions but also all the other radios in the area unless we lock on to an unused channel.

The local race series in Breckenridge uses radios with repeaters and I can often listen in on some of the transmissions during the race.

I hope this sheds some light on the why’s and how’s of personal telecommunication devices.

See you in Moab

J. J. Damnit!!!


Name: Dwight
Email: drhog@cox.net
Date: Tue, Aug 26, 2003, 12:47:21
Message:
It worked well for us at Tahoe '03. Good success calling in from about 10 min out, and it helped provide a head's up for our one mechanical problem (flat). We used Motorolas clipped and taped to our Camelback straps. As long as it wasn't a technical section, I could use one hand to push the button and get a call out without slowing down.

Name: John
Email: john@ktua.com
Date: Tue, Apr 15, 2003, 17:17:03
Message:
Yes they are. The incoming rider can notify the rest of the crew when he or she is at the point where the next rider needs to be waiting at the transition. As a bonus, the way the Temecula, California course is laid out, it looks like it's virtually all within the two mile range limit of most radios. Finally, it's nice to hear from somebody checking on you once in a while, especially at around 3:00 AM, when there's no another soul in sight.

Name: John
Email: john@ktua.com
Date: Tue, Apr 15, 2003, 17:16:35
Message:
Yes they are. The incoming rider can notify the rest of the crew when he or she is at the point where the next rider needs to be waiting at the transition. As a bonus, the way the Temecula, California course is laid out, it looks like it's virtually all within the two mile range limit of most radios. Finally, it's nice to hear from somebody checking on you once in a while, especially at around 3:00 AM, when there's no another soul in sight.

Name: JG
Email: grrsh@yahoo.com
Date: Mon, Feb 10, 2003, 19:56:53
Message:
We used motorola radios at tahoe with good success. they didn't work at the top of the mountain but did work on the downhill. our team would usually cough up some warning on the downhill so we knew when to be at the transition.

Name: fresh
Email: softcoconut@msn.com.
Date: Fri, Jan 03, 2003, 19:43:27
Message:
Reject the automobile. Reject the 2 way radio. Gears are good.

Name: chuck clark
Email: cclark@ziclix.com
Date: Sat, Apr 27, 2002, 17:14:02
Message:
cell phones definitely do not work at snowshoe so just leave it at home

last year i lost my chain (not as in dropped..as in it broke, came off and was not to be found) on my night lap, just before powerline...i was able to coast down and then at the bottom someone came by and had a 2-way radio...i asked them to radio back and notify my team as to why i was slow for the lap since i had to push it in
(although to be honest i wasn't much slower since we had to push for so much of the course anyways :-)

Name: Mark
Email: lewismarkr@yahoo.com
Date: Wed, Feb 27, 2002, 13:09:03
Message:
Jokes aside, we thought they were very useful at Snowshoe in '01. Around the base it was great to call to each other to bring spare parts to the pit, or make sure the on-deck-rider was where he was supposed to be when he was supposed to be there. For instance, we'd watch the racer come thru the pit area, and then call up to the next rider that he had X minutes to go.


Name: Haydog
Email: htarpley@suncompcs.net
Date: Thu, Jan 31, 2002, 08:34:15
Message:
Hey Hubtech and Hub. Did you guys take into account the possibilities of high Voltage Standing Wave Ratio readings from combining incompatible coated clothes line with a bad connection at the pork and beans cans? I've found that the large Maxwell House coffee cans offer the best velocity sector splitting and sound wave compression dynamics especially w/ bad weather. I like the use of the Koss headset-can you get those in Crutchfield though?

Name: HubTech
Email: admin@hubtech.net
Date: Sat, Jun 16, 2001, 21:48:45
Message:
In responce to hubs@dandy.net! I told you that the smaller cans would not work. My suggestions to use a splitter string at the termination points to form a "Stereo" system would have increased the high end freqency responce. Using a "high density" clothes line would alow for greater band width for those all important low freqs. Using industrial mayonnaise cans positioned directly over the Franibulum of each ear would have alowed for your wrong turn with larger surface area at the connection of the diaphram. Placement is crittical. I would also suggest that a pair of Koss Pro-4A Ear pads would make the head set much more comfortable and would also serve to funnel the sound more directly to the Franibulum and inner ear. Using coated clothes line will decrease the line loss or "Velocity Factor" of the line not to mention keeping the equipment dry. I understand that there was quite allot of water on the course. Hope I was of some help for the next race.

Name: Hub
Email: hubs@dandy.net
Date: Sat, Jun 16, 2001, 00:46:51
Message:
We used a set of tin cans (pork & bean cans)connected by a thin string. this system is approved by the FCC and FDA. It worked well until I took the sharp right hand turn off the first dirt road section. Reception audio clarity and sound pressure level is directly proportional to cross-sectional transmission line area. Do not use Silly String as the network backbone.

Name: kes
Email: kes4682@yahoo.com
Date: Sun, Apr 15, 2001, 23:12:35
Message:
I live at Snowshoe. Cell phones work in some places but only if you have Cellular One or ATT service. We use radios while on the trails.

Name: MF
Email: Not Available
Date: Mon, Apr 02, 2001, 14:08:28
Message:
We used Motorola 2-ways (FRS 80) last year at Snowshoe. They covered most of the course and were invaluable. Cell phones don't work except in certain areas discovered by accident.

Name: Kris Bonello
Email: kbonello@worldnet.att.net
Date: Tue, Mar 20, 2001, 10:23:29
Message:
There is a radio telescope near Snowshoe and I have heard that there is a radio blackout of some sort. I don't think cell phones will work. You should probably check with the Snowshoe staff to see how they communicate on the mountain.

Name: mike
Email: pleaforpeace@earthlink.com
Date: Wed, Feb 28, 2001, 10:44:09
Message:
i dont think that cell phones will werk in the dense forest.
Although maybe the nextel ones i use for bike couring would werk, they have like an 80 mile radius,
and they act like 2-way radios!

Name: Mike Bowles
Email: mike.bowles@acterna.com
Date: Mon, Feb 19, 2001, 17:30:26
Message:
2-way radios do not cover the entire course. However, they are great for keeping in touch around the venue and maybe a mile out on the course.

Name: Name
Email: gnkcck@aol.com
Date: Mon, Feb 12, 2001, 15:51:05
Message:
Will Cell Phones work? Why buy 2 way radios?!
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