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Current topics (click to view the thoughts in a topic):


This topic is: Night riding tips and strategies

Thoughts in this topic

Name: Brad B.
Email: info@flashbakonline.com
Date: Sat, Sep 26, 2009, 22:01:49
Message:
We set-up our team last year in Texas, at the 24 hours of dirt in Smithville with a batch of FlashBaks. Our amber lights made it very easy to find our riders while on the course. Safety first. A tried rider can plow right into you while you are just cranking way. Be safe & Be Seen.
www.flashbakonline.com


Name: BaronKarza
Email: shadowhawk30@hotmail.com
Date: Thu, Jun 18, 2009, 12:34:57
Message:
One more thing...
A rear red indicator light isn't a bad idea. A really powerful strobe flasher found on a commuter bike would be more than a little annoying. But a 1-bulb LED might wake up a tired or endorphin-addled rider that might plow into you a 3AM as you stop to dislodge debris from your bike, or unwrap a power bar. Oh, and don't leave your bike ON THE TRAIL if you need to fix a flat after dark. VERY BAD IDEA!

Name: BaronKarza
Email: shadowhawk30@hotmail.com
Date: Thu, Jun 18, 2009, 12:26:14
Message:
The two-light system (one on helmet, one on bars) may cost you more, but you can navigate really technical stuff better. A bar-mounted light will cast a deep shadow behind even tiny bumps. A helmet light will cancel that out. You can aim a helmet light around a hairpin better, too. Rally car drivers aim their headlights at different distances down the road to cope with abrupt course changes. This will mean more batteries, but you'll be able to react faster.

Name: Andrea
Email: church@hispeed.ch
Date: Fri, Jan 23, 2009, 08:29:27
Message:
Nite riding is a thrilling experience, you must try on the snow, is so special.
Is like to be in another world...
Andrea, Switzerland
If you are familiare with facebook ceck MTB night riders group

Name: bert heathwood
Email: pastamakesyoufasta@gmail.com
Date: Wed, Nov 29, 2006, 23:52:13
Message:
re: 24 hour newbie's question about how solos keep their batteries charged. I have done 6 solo efforts, originally i had 5 Ni-Hd things for my old cat-eye set, one of them was a home made job that lasted 6 hours but had to be taped onto my frame. I now run a Vicious Power www.viciouspower.com HID set, the normal batteries last 2.5hr on high power, 4.5 on low but charge in 2 so with three batteries you have always got one spare in your back pocket (and they weigh

Name: 24hr newbie
Email: tailor@cjdaley.com
Date: Thu, Jul 14, 2005, 07:43:13
Message:
How do 24hr riders recharge batteries?

Name: kirra
Email: kirrajaye@msn.com
Date: Wed, Sep 03, 2003, 16:06:23
Message:
I was wondering where most people get their lights and what are peoples favourite brands and why. I am looking to buy a new handleber light and helmet light in order to do more serious night trail riding and am trying to research in order to get the best bargain out there. (and I'm a ski bum so I don't have a lot of money to spend)

Name: larry
Email: larry6787@yahoo.com
Date: Sat, May 31, 2003, 15:20:09
Message:
three letters: H.I.D.

Name: fclarke
Email: fclarke @fwash.com
Date: Sat, May 24, 2003, 00:18:42
Message:
helmet and bar lights for sure but run your lowest wattage lamp when climbing or pushing... Save the brights for desending....conserve your run time

Name: WoodenMike
Email: williedogproductions@lasal.net
Date: Tue, Sep 24, 2002, 00:07:03
Message:
For the Behind the Rocks course, I'd recommend a helmet light and a bike light, da brighter da better.
And, children, please, wear eye protection whenever you ride your bikes!

Name: Sonny
Email: sonny@sonnysideup.com
Date: Mon, Jul 29, 2002, 12:23:11
Message:
I've been night riding regularly for 4 years. Went through a lot of lighting systems. But by far the best light out there is the Niterider HID. These guys are as bright as a BMW. The best part is the charge lasts 4.5 hours! No need to carry a spare unless you forget to charge the battery.

Name: Tweek
Email: nope@noemail.com
Date: Wed, Jun 19, 2002, 10:46:06
Message:
I agree with the specs thing. I got a tree branch up my nose that almost killed me a few years back-Sent me to the ER for awhile. Anyway, the nostril is very close to the eye, so I rarely ride w/o specs now!

Name: Telden
Email: wordbooty_2@hotmail.com
Date: Fri, Feb 01, 2002, 13:56:01
Message:
The two lights tip is a good one. Get used to your lights... FOR HEAVEN'S SAKE.... CYCLE YOUR BATTERIES!!! Also, it is a good idea to wear a pair of glasses at night. I just pop a pair of clear lenses into my riding specs. In one of my night laps at the 2001 24 of moab, a tree branch hit me right in the face! My glasses saved my eyes

Name: mario
Email: mrzed666@hotmail.com
Date: Thu, Jan 31, 2002, 04:42:43
Message:
make sure you get a dodgy set of lights then go down the roughest descent around wherever you live go as fast as you can and when your lights start flashing and blinking dont slow down i guarantee you its the best rush youll ever experience. if you survive youll be talking about it years to come...

Name: Brian Archer
Email: Brinan39@mindspring.com
Date: Thu, May 31, 2001, 12:17:03
Message:
Aiming your bar light 2-3 feet in front of your front wheel really helps in the evil, nasty stuff. It lessens the tendency to get really bad shadows and doesn't screw up your depth perception.

Name: MF
Email: Not Available
Date: Mon, Apr 02, 2001, 16:23:21
Message:
We found a couple to a half-dozen rides at night to be sufficient training. You need to get used to your lights and how they work (and also gain confidence in their duration). More important to arrive early and ride the course in daylight so you'll know it. Agree with the sunrise/sunset laps. They were spectacular. One tip: fully charge your lights and time their burn at different settings to get an idea as to how long they'll last.

Name: alicia
Email: alicia@aris.sfrc.ufl.edu
Date: Mon, Mar 12, 2001, 10:51:56
Message:
Try to time it so you get the sunset and/or the sunrise laps, they are awesome. Also give words of encouragement to others as you go, it makes a big difference. I can get frustrating if the course is wet and muddy, as it was last year, so a good conversation with a new friend while running thru the mud in the dark can be a lasting memory.

Name: doug
Email: dugnatie@law.uoregon.edu
Date: Mon, Feb 26, 2001, 20:59:02
Message:
Get two lights. one helmet, and one bar. spend the money for a digital system so you can power down and conserve battery energy. whatever you do, mount your helmet light on top of the helmet as opposed to at the front to avoid the weight of the light pulling your helmet down towards your eyes.

Name: Dave
Email: dporter@trex.com
Date: Mon, Feb 26, 2001, 16:02:31
Message:
Practice riding at night LONG before the event, and on trails of great difficulty. If you haven't ridden Snowshoe yet, Lower Beaver Dam will be a rude awakening with only a few night rides under your belt.


Name: Chris Johnson
Email: chrisj@n2bikes.com
Date: Wed, Feb 21, 2001, 11:55:12
Message:
Don't fall off the cliffs at Snowshoe like I did last year...

Name: Steve Johanson
Email: sjohanson2@yahoo.com
Date: Thu, Feb 15, 2001, 10:52:37
Message:
After a year of night riding I have found that aiming your lights further down the trail than you would think pays off. I recommend a helmet and a bar light as a minimum if you want to get any speed.
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