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Current topics (click to view the thoughts in a topic):


This topic is: How do you train for a 24 hour race?

Thoughts in this topic

Name: James Team DNR
Email: jamesplancarte@mac.com
Date: Thu, Oct 02, 2008, 13:34:48
Message:
I recommend NOT drinking till 4 a.m. the night before, Beer is a wonderful thing, wine even better, but the two together, in the desert, before a race, with sleep deprivation, involving balance, pain and suffering, and a team that makes you wear a tampon around your neck if you complain is a bad combination, stop drinking by 2 and you'll be much better off.

Name: Jeff
Email: vanguenzel@comcast.net
Date: Fri, Sep 12, 2008, 14:37:43
Message:
During your training and during the race, I suggest liberal application of lube AND deoderant, perhaps in places where you are not accustomed to putting them.

Name: Ben Lagueux
Email: onespd@gmail.com
Date: Fri, May 09, 2008, 13:48:38
Message:
There's a bunch of good advice on here. I'd add that it's important to be comfortable riding at race speed at night. In addition to improving your speed and smoothness, regularly practicing night riding will exorcise the equipment problems that can explode a lap time. The result is that you'll be more confident in your abilities and equipment; that can't hurt your results.

Name: Jack Connolly
Email: mr.jackconnolly@gmail.com
Date: Fri, Dec 21, 2007, 00:34:22
Message:
To save serious new readers from having to filter all of the material below for the good stuff (there are tons of great stories and jokes if you really want to read it all):

--------------------------------
From TEC [Tue, Sep 10, 2002]:
Message:
1) Bike position: Bike fit is critical. You're going to hurt. However, you'll hurt a lot less if your bike fits properly. You may want to consider a higher bar/stem position (positive angle stem or riser bars) than normal as it will relieve some strain on the neck/back (especially if solo). Seat choice is also important. Make sure you do a few epic rides (five + hours) to validate your position.

2) Long rides: Nothing prepares you to go long like going long. This goes way beyond just the mental conditioning. Going long will help you determine what kind of foods work well for you, what digests for you, what your body craves. You can also accustomize yourself to religiously rehydrating over many hours.

3) Vaseline, Desitin, A&D oitments are divine. You will chaff in places you didn't know existed. It's better to find this out on an epic than to experience it on race day. Liberal applicantion of lubricants is highly recommended.

4) Don't forget your feet, to include shoe choice. You may experience some foot swelling (especially with a lot of hike and bike), so think about sizing. Socks or no socks is another consideration as well as pre-taping any problem areas or hot spots. Do some walking in your cycling shoes - make sure they're comfortable. Bring along an extra pair if you have them. Also include checking your cleats on your pre-race mech inspection. Loose or lost cleats suck.

5) Pack a race box with tools and plenty of spares. Tubes, tubes, tubes, brake shoes, derailleur and brake wires, spokes (correct size), a spare chain, an extra tire, a fork pump (to fit yours), extra bolts, a spare rear derailleur is nice if you have it (even if it's an old one - long as it's compatible). Most races have some mech/bike shop support, but it will cost you time and $$$ for the parts.

6) Clothing choice: Comfort. Try it first. Make sure the shorts fit and don't chaff. Think about weather extremes (hot and cold). Leg and arm warmers, long and short sleeve jerseys, jackets, vests, ear warmer/hat, gloves.

7) Ride at night. Ride technical trails at night. Become very familiar with your lights. Train with the lights you will use. Cycle your batteries. Make sure you will have battery support at the race for the type of lights you have or buy an extra. Use a bike mounted light as your primary (sink your money into this one first). Buy a helmet mounted light - even if it's one of the less expensive models not designed primarily for biking (i.e. Petzl type) - it will save you on switchbacks and technical stuff.

8) Above all -- RIDE!!! Ride really long. Ride in the A.M., ride in the P.M. When you finish riding really long - get back on your bike and ride some more.

9) Have fun. Suffering is inevitable, but as long as you keep a good attitude and try to make it fun, you'll suffer a lot less.

10) Final thought - start slow and taper - it's going to be a long day!

--------------------------------
From Dwight [Tue, Aug 26, 2003]
Message:
This thread is supposed to provide tips for training for one of these races, and there has been precious little advice on that topic in the last year. Since we just finished Tahoe '03, I'll give what insights I can from a rookie's perspective.

Team Choice: There are several factors here, so consider your goals. If you want mainly have a good time, choose your best buds. If you want to be competitive, be selective and go for the best riders you can find. Even if you're just going for fun, this is a grueling format and you need to choose racers that have the time and motivation to train hard.

Training Rides: I won't speak for the solo effort, as that is a completely different animal than the relay. For the relay teams, you are training for speed and ability to recover and do it again (and again, and again....) I don't think super epic training rides are the way to go. We tried to do back-to-back 1.5 hour rides with about 3 hours off between. I think that was a good start, but next time I would put more emphasis on training FAST, and would culminate our training with a simulated race day of 4 one-hour rides with 3 hours of recovery between.

Speed Training: Good hills are key to your training plan. Find a ride with a sustained 20-30 min climb, and really work to get your times down. Train (and race) with a heart rate monitor so you will know the HR at which your muscles start to flush with lactic acid. In training, this is good--it will push up your anaerobic threshold. In the race, try to stay below this level to preserve something for later laps. At least at Tahoe, descending confidently through technical single track was a key skill. Even if you are a good descender, you must practice at night to get the confidence to bomb in the dark.

Recovery: This is so important to the relay racer that it deserves a focused plan. Nutrition is crucial, and we followed some fairly accepted guidelines. After each lap, we drank a recovery drink and had some food within 1 hour. We tried to hit a 4:1 carb/protein ratio. This was our main source of calories. About 30-45 minutes before my lap, I would have some fruit, a Powerbar, or some gel. During the race, gel and Accelerade were my only energy sources. Test each food/drink you plan to use during your training rides so you will know that it won't upset your stomach. Also, have a few choices available. Your body will be under stress, and a planned sandwich just might not feel right, where a piece of fruit and some Pringles may go down OK. After getting some food and drink in the stomach, spend some time on the muscles. I stretched after each lap, and then worked my legs over with a massage tool called "The Stick." I think it helped a lot. At Northstar, there is also a hot tub near the start/finish that I visited 3 times during the race. Finally, budget some time to get horizontal, even if it is only for a half hour. Simulate these short naps in your training schedule, if possible. There is a definite "rythym" to the whole recovery window, and is best to figure out what works best for you before the race, and then apply it with discipline.

Periodization Window: I'm no expert on this, so this is just an idea. When you start your training plan depends on your base level of fitness. Based on what I've read, I think 2 months could be OK for someone in good shape, and 3 would be ideal for most of us. A decent plan may start with 1.5-2.0 hour rides up to 3 times/week to build base endurance. Next, use your midweek rides to work on hills and speed (still single event rides), and add doubles (2 one hour rides with 3-4 hours recovery, one ride preferably at night). With 4-6 weeks left to the race, increase this to a triple-ride day. I would culminate with a quadruple 3 weeks before the race and taper from there.

Well, there are my thoughts. Now, I'd like to hear from some of these superhero teams that posted 25 laps!
--------------------------------
From Name: Austin [Sun, Sep 26, 2004]
Message:
Well. This will be my 3rd year of 24 hour races. The First Year. I trained and Trained. The Second Year, I broke my arm 6 weeks before Moab, and had a full arm cast. This Year, I have been running alot for endurance. I have also been riding my hard-tail bike so that I would choose my lines on the technical parts better, so when I get on my Foes FXC, I will choose the right line and be in control (instead of plowing through it). Just go on a 10 min. sprint every day untill you have about 4 days untill your race. Also ride about 45 min. hard (best would be a hill climb), but different areas each day. Go on a easy spin the day before your race, EAT RIGHT (helps in a 24 hour race), Sleep, stretch, dont waste your energy on the first lap, race your guts out during the night (during the night was when I had my best Lap time). Eat everything you can hold after each lap. It Helps.
Good Luck & see ya in Moab in 2 1/2 weeks!

--------------------------------
From Name: Bob [Fri, Feb 02, 2007]
Message:
It is very simple....just ride a ton!! When you get tired of riding, cross-train...jog, lift light weights (with a focus on higher reps), and maintain a smart diet. Don't forget to train a night as well. There is alot of time to be made at night. There is nothing better and more peaceful than riding in West Virginia in the middle of the night... just keep your eyes open for the reflection of little eyes stairing at you when you ride by them!!

--------------------------------
And of course, mine:
[] Ride the track you intend to race on as much and as often as possible. You will find out by this method what your body, gear, skills, etc.. need to make the experience what you want it to be. If you cannot ride that particular track before you race there, then find some similar conditions and work that as much and as often as possible.

[] Nutrition is key to your body and you cannot start this process just prior to the race; your body has to be in the condition you need long before the race so that it is working like a finely tuned machine.

[] Bikes are machines - so is your body. Both need the proper maintenance and attention to details to make them effective under a variety of conditions. You cannot really expect much from something that you have allowed to deteriorate. Unlike bikes, bodie need conditioning, so you had better plan on a good bit of it if you have let your machine deteriorate.

[] Approach 24-Hour Race training with the proper and realistic expectations. If you have trained for years and feel that you have a real shot at winning - go for it. If you haven't, don't delude yourself and rob the fun of it away from yourself (and your teammates). The challenge of, and subsequent reward from, experiences like this is more in overcoming ourselves than it is the mountains.

I hope this was a helpful consolidation of the good stuff. Train right, plan, prepare, ride and have fun. Good luck!

By the way, if your name is Joe Sheets, YOU can follow ME this year around Big Bear. I will have a jersey that glows in the dark just for you! Oh, MAV!

Name: David
Email: t75dnb1@yahoo.com
Date: Mon, Dec 10, 2007, 22:41:49
Message:
Ride, loose the extra 20 lbs, keep your riding buddies close, read about riding and dont be afraid to rest.

Name: JK
Email: john.kessler@longandfoster.com
Date: Thu, Mar 22, 2007, 14:01:52
Message:
Drink beer all winter and sometime aound april 1st realize that you are 20 lbs heavy and you still have a flat tire from last fall. Meet with your buddies , drink beer and issue the 24 hour challange... Then panic and start riding... Most of all, ride and enjoy the whole thing

Name: Bob
Email: mtnbiking4fun@hotmail.com
Date: Fri, Feb 02, 2007, 06:26:19
Message:
It is very simple....just ride a ton!! When you get tired of riding, cross-train...jog, lift light weights (with a focus on higher reps), and maintain a smart diet. Don\'t forget to train a night as well. There is alot of time to be made at night. There is nothing better and more peaceful than riding in the middle of the night... just keep your eyes open for the reflection of little eyes stairing at you when you ride by them!!

Name: Non Roadie
Email: jay@hotmail.com
Date: Wed, May 31, 2006, 21:52:58
Message:
Ride your MOUNTAIN BIKE and dont complain about how hard the MOUNTAIN BIKE course is!!!!! - we are MOUNTAIN BIKER-- TOO many road bikers part time mountain bikers are influencing the mtb courses... Mbters dont complain when something is too hard.... BRING ON THE CHALLENGE

Name: Paperboy
Email: cbeats@netzero.com
Date: Wed, Sep 01, 2004, 22:07:06
Message:
Vaseline (for your feet) AND THEN socks.

Name: matt
Email: mks@netscape.net
Date: Sun, Aug 15, 2004, 23:09:58
Message:
Experince in your only friend.
If you want to do well, train 80% harder then the actual event. pace yourself, eat, rest, and warm up 15 to 20 min before your ride, ie, wind trainer. don't freak about night riding
it is fun, and think of the stories you can tell. good riding.

Name: Todd
Email: schoenitr@msx.upmc.edu
Date: Fri, May 21, 2004, 12:49:14
Message:
.....Or ignore my lower response adn just listen to RustyNipples, I like his.

Name: Sucker
Email: daniel@trailvictim.com
Date: Thu, May 20, 2004, 08:40:28
Message:
Don\'t listen to these people. If you\'re thinking about riding a 24hr just do it and quit asking questions. It will be one of the best times of your life.

Name: RustyNipples
Email: not@important.com
Date: Thu, May 06, 2004, 08:16:23
Message:
Lets see... There are 12 oz in one bottled beer. 72 oz fit in the average camelback. That would be... six beers. Ok, so get a six pack of beer. If you plan on riding or should we say walking the mud and mire of this course (snowshoe), an adequate amount of impairing substances (so as to appreciable impair your metal faculties) is crucial to making this a truly enjoyable day.

Unless you actually ride on an average basis, follow these helpful hints. Oh, one six pack per lap.

If you are going to ride at moab... ride your road bike and go running on the beach once in a while. Half of the course is flat. The other is sand.
No alcohol required. Good luck!


Name: Todd
Email: schoenitr@msx.upmc.edu
Date: Fri, Apr 30, 2004, 11:14:00
Message:
Training... Well, there's lots of ways you can do it. The most simple one is, "ride a lot." (stolen from Eddie Merckyx, 'the cannibal') But, I would spend about 9-12 hours riding hard in the saddle per week and maybe take one day to do a long 3-4 hour ride. Give yourself at least 1-2 days off during the week. Pay attention to your body though and don't overtrain, you'll get frustrated quickly when that happens. Eating is ket also. Make sure you're eating decently and eating enough. Calories burn quickly on a bike, especially at 10hrs. per week. The toughest part is not training your body, but training your head. Gear yourself up for a little suffering, it's killer!

Name: ME
Email: ME@ME.com
Date: Thu, Apr 08, 2004, 13:58:39
Message:
walk 10 miles in the rain and mud every day carrying a broken bike

Name: Team HardTail
Email: btplus1@yahoo.com
Date: Mon, Feb 23, 2004, 19:25:00
Message:
Ride the largest hills you can find . Stay on the bike 10-12 hours a week .
During the race eat every lap. Eat something that agrees with you
when you hammering down . I like Chicken noodle soap and peanut butter crackers .
If you ride a hardtail then get a Cane Creek Thudbuster .Throw all other post out the window ! With a Thudbuster you will go faster by improving traction (spin seated through rough terrain) and reducing fatigue this post is by far better than any other .
Ride Cane Creek Ti Wheels with carbon bars . Go Plushness !For Hardtail 24s
I competed in the 24 hours of Adrenalin race.
Two man team we finished second the first year and first the second year.
I rode all of it on my Thudbuster . Thanks! Cane Creek .
The Atlanta Chapter loves you !
Bt.


Name: Ben Lagueux
Email: onespd@cs.com
Date: Mon, Oct 06, 2003, 23:20:57
Message:
When it cums to training practice is the key. I ride my buddies-err- with my buddies everynight to simulate the passion and drive one must have while riding at night. Practice makes perfect! Also, one must enjoy these moments and not shy away, this is what seperates the men from the boys, not that being a boy is bad, we always love boys.

Name: Liza the Dog
Email: rbartjmk@yahoo.com
Date: Mon, Oct 06, 2003, 12:27:51
Message:
I cannot speak for the serious podium-bound teams or individuals for training, but I have some tips from two years at Snowshoe and a local dawn to dusk relay race.

Remember that the the training is part of the race, and that the race is the culmination of that training. What I mean by this is make the training and the race fun. In your training, go out and hammer it hard, do what you do to keep yourself energized (food, drinks, energy bars, yodling, whatever), and try not to stress yourself out worrying about your third lap or whether your stomach will be upset. Exercise releases stress, but trying too hard to maintain a rigid schedule causes it. Train at awkward times, like getting up at 4:00 am and riding before work or riding at your normal bed time. Know your lights. You may even want to ride a couple of times a day a couple of weeks before the race. But don't overdo it. What is the point of going out to Moab and paying $125 if you did a "simulated" race two weeks before.


Name: G
Email: ketchumgreg@hotmail.com
Date: Thu, Sep 04, 2003, 15:03:50
Message:
Just ride and yes, it's a good idea to do a night ride or two to at least get used to your lights. Somebody down below said to ride 30+ hours/week. they're on crack. Solos don't even train/ride that much. It's a simple routine, ride, eat, rest, ride, eat, rest....
The trail......well, I haven't done Temecula, but the other 3 are all "braided" trails and jeep road with some very technical sections thrown in. For the most part, they're just "hammered" trails. Each is pretty characteristic of the area.
Just ride your bike as much as possible, know how to change a flat, and have fun...

Name: Dwight
Email: drhog@cox.net
Date: Tue, Aug 26, 2003, 13:59:23
Message:
This thread is supposed to provide tips for training for one of these races, and there has been precious little advice on that topic in the last year. Since we just finished Tahoe '03, I'll give what insights I can from a rookie's perspective.

Team Choice: There are several factors here, so consider your goals. If you want mainly have a good time, choose your best buds. If you want to be competitive, be selective and go for the best riders you can find. Even if you're just going for fun, this is a grueling format and you need to choose racers that have the time and motivation to train hard.

Training Rides: I won't speak for the solo effort, as that is a completely different animal than the relay. For the relay teams, you are training for speed and ability to recover and do it again (and again, and again....) I don't think super epic training rides are the way to go. We tried to do back-to-back 1.5 hour rides with about 3 hours off between. I think that was a good start, but next time I would put more emphasis on training FAST, and would culminate our training with a simulated race day of 4 one-hour rides with 3 hours of recovery between.

Speed Training: Good hills are key to your training plan. Find a ride with a sustained 20-30 min climb, and really work to get your times down. Train (and race) with a heart rate monitor so you will know the HR at which your muscles start to flush with lactic acid. In training, this is good--it will push up your anaerobic threshold. In the race, try to stay below this level to preserve something for later laps. At least at Tahoe, descending confidently through technical single track was a key skill. Even if you are a good descender, you must practice at night to get the confidence to bomb in the dark.

Recovery: This is so important to the relay racer that it deserves a focused plan. Nutrition is crucial, and we followed some fairly accepted guidelines. After each lap, we drank a recovery drink and had some food within 1 hour. We tried to hit a 4:1 carb/protein ratio. This was our main source of calories. About 30-45 minutes before my lap, I would have some fruit, a Powerbar, or some gel. During the race, gel and Accelerade were my only energy sources. Test each food/drink you plan to use during your training rides so you will know that it won't upset your stomach. Also, have a few choices available. Your body will be under stress, and a planned sandwich just might not feel right, where a piece of fruit and some Pringles may go down OK. After getting some food and drink in the stomach, spend some time on the muscles. I stretched after each lap, and then worked my legs over with a massage tool called "The Stick." I think it helped a lot. At Northstar, there is also a hot tub near the start/finish that I visited 3 times during the race. Finally, budget some time to get horizontal, even if it is only for a half hour. Simulate these short naps in your training schedule, if possible. There is a definite "rythym" to the whole recovery window, and is best to figure out what works best for you before the race, and then apply it with discipline.

Periodization Window: I'm no expert on this, so this is just an idea. When you start your training plan depends on your base level of fitness. Based on what I've read, I think 2 months could be OK for someone in good shape, and 3 would be ideal for most of us. A decent plan may start with 1.5-2.0 hour rides up to 3 times/week to build base endurance. Next, use your midweek rides to work on hills and speed (still single event rides), and add doubles (2 one hour rides with 3-4 hours recovery, one ride preferably at night). With 4-6 weeks left to the race, increase this to a triple-ride day. I would culminate with a quadruple 3 weeks before the race and taper from there.

Well, there are my thoughts. Now, I'd like to hear from some of these superhero teams that posted 25 laps!

Name: Jack
Email: bikejake@comcast.net
Date: Mon, Aug 04, 2003, 17:05:04
Message:
For Moab: Get your nutrition sorted out, your lights dialed in, have extra sets of dry clothes for each lap (particularly night time laps... it can be COLD,)be prepared to ride through sand and technical rock... ride hard, but most of all, have fun; it can be a blast!

Name: Travis
Email: wblawtmm@law.com
Date: Wed, Jun 18, 2003, 13:14:16
Message:
This is to Diana. I have a girlfriend that started mountain biking last summer and has progressed rather well. This race is NOT for her!!!! It is an extremely bad course that even Granny Gear seems to now admit is not acceptable. Its only about a 12 mile loop. It is two extremes: 1. single track that you can't ride and 2. gravel roads and ski slopes that are not mountain bike trails at all. You could do this race if you want, just promise to walk through the single track.

Name: Jack
Email: Not Available
Date: Mon, Jun 16, 2003, 16:57:29
Message:
To Diana..... I don't beleive a novice should jump right in to a 24 hour race. If you did then expect to get banged up pretty good. The night riding can be tough, depending on weather and trail conditions. Plus Laird seems to think that we all want to carry our bikes around instead of ride them, and his Snowshoe race course just plain sucks. And with all the rain this year, I think you'd do that race and it would be a very poor introduction to the sport. You might not keep riding and there are plenty of other really nice trails to be ridden. Get some more riding under your belt first. Plus, Snowshoe this year will most likely suck worst than last year.



Name: Dan
Email: dan_j_matthews@hotmail.com
Date: Mon, Jun 16, 2003, 10:00:18
Message:
This is to answer Karen's request to describe the Moab course. It starts out on a slowly climbing road for about 1.2 miles (last year they diverted this section to a sandy singletrack alongside the road - I think people complained and it may go back to the road this year). It then turns left up a climb that is moderately technical for about another 2.0 miles. It picks up a fire road for a bit, then gets very technical for about another few miles. There are big rocky technical ups and downs, and a fast downhill sand dune that is about 1/4 mile long, along with another uphill sand dune that is about 100 ft of vertical). This technical section continues to about a mile or two before Prostitute Butte, where it becomes a fast doubletrack. Once around the Butte, another double track is encountered, which is very sandy at times. That section ends with a big, loose rock and sandy downhill. After that is a climb back up to the Butte that is also very sandy at times. Once back at the top, you have about 4.0 miles back to the start. This is all jeep road, and very fast. However, you will hit a few very sandy sections that can be scary at speed. You also cross a few sandy washes. The final 1/4 mile or so is up a small hill before the last 200 yards into the finish. I measured the lap at about 15 miles total, with about 1,750 ft of climbing per lap.

Name: Diana
Email: Not Available
Date: Fri, Jun 13, 2003, 11:30:45
Message:
Is this something a complete novice can do? There is a team of bike riders who are trying to recruit me into their team but I have never mountain biked before. I am fairly athletic but this sounds like something you'd want some experience for.... Or, could it be a fun, social, challenge thing if we want it to be if we're prepared to be in some pain afterwards?

Name: Diana
Email: Not Available
Date: Fri, Jun 13, 2003, 11:19:51
Message:
Is this something a complete novice can do? There is a team of bike riders who are trying to recruit me into their team but I have never mountain biked before. I am fairly athletic but this sounds like something you'd want some experience for.... Or, could it be a fun, social, challenge thing if we want it to be if we're prepared to be in some pain afterwards?

Name: Karen
Email: kmillar62@yahoo.com
Date: Mon, Jun 02, 2003, 10:51:41
Message:
Can some talk specifically about the 24 hours of Moab race? I need course information... can you describe it? Thanks!

Name: dave
Email: david5616@hotmail.com
Date: Sat, May 31, 2003, 15:17:35
Message:
Adding some running into your workouts won't hurt. On a wet course well, you'll be doing more runing than you will want. On a dry course sometimes it's just faster to run. For example, passing groups of tired or slower riders. Also, it's usually more energy efficient for mortals to walk/jog up the wall section.

Name: frank
Email: fclarke @fwash.com
Date: Sat, May 24, 2003, 00:07:19
Message:
1.practice long fire road climbs
2.Use flat bmx style pedals, as clip-in and toe clips are a poor choice in snowshoes mostly unrideable singletrack
3.wear broken in trail running shoes(see #2)
4.If you are prone to acidy stomach ,
use pepcid AC as over eating will occur.
5.try to keep moving at forward at all times.don't be 2 two serious!!

Name: JL
Email: jlark1@yahoo.com
Date: Thu, Apr 17, 2003, 16:30:40
Message:
It would be really be quite novel if instead of every individual copying the previous numbskull's jokes about the mud and the rain and the roots, he/she actually provided some quality suggestions or personal experiences about how to best train for a 24 event. John Claman's message on April 16, 2001 was fairly hilarious...after that it just got old. At any rate, there are alot of seasoned 24 racers reading this thread so I hope they speak up with some good advice (props to TEC for the detailed suggestions)
And also be specific - ranting and raving for half a page about the mud and roots at Snowshoe isn't going to do a damn bit of good for someone preparing for Moab.

Name: Shawn Jeppe
Email: jitterjepp@aol.com
Date: Thu, Mar 13, 2003, 01:30:11
Message:
What do you mean boring? What about the 24-Moab race? That muddy there? You must be talking about Snowshoe. I don't know how heavy the Rock Hopper is. After about 14 hours is seams real heavy but it could be all in my head. I saw this dude last year on a big arse FS bike. That thing looked real heavy. At first I thought it was a guy riding a dirt bike or a moped.

Name: Lee
Email: Not Available
Date: Wed, Mar 12, 2003, 14:45:19
Message:
This is a 24 hour bike push, so you don't need to ride. Just push things around your yard in the mud. Take a hose and wet down the ground real good. I'm not planning to waist my time with this "race". Too much money and a really boring trail. Much better races around than this one.

Name: Chris
Email: clcrandall@earthlink.net
Date: Fri, Feb 21, 2003, 17:24:17
Message:
Shawn,
How heavy is that Rockhopper? Coz' you will be pushing/carrying it a lot. Wear good shoes w/ ankle support to help with the running (or walking depending on the lap).

Name: Heather George
Email: pghclayart@yahoo.com
Date: Mon, Feb 03, 2003, 13:51:12
Message:
lets see, its feb. if youre not training now...leave where you are and start. Find a good stretch of mud atleast a foot deep, carry your bike over your shoulder and run through it. Oh, do it at 3 a.m. and for kicks change your tire in the middle of it.

goodtimes.

Name: Shawn
Email: jitterjepp@aol.com
Date: Wed, Jan 29, 2003, 21:24:47
Message:
How bad does a Specialized orange and black
Rockhopper comp suck for a 24 hour race?
I don't know how to start a new post here.

It's the only mountain bike I've ever owned and it seems ok I guess. How about some smack and beta on this.



Name: Shawn
Email: jitterjepp@aol.com
Date: Wed, Jan 29, 2003, 21:16:08
Message:
I've done the 24 hours of Afton a few times. You have to train if you are going solo and planning to get more than a couple of laps. I've had bad luck with my bike (because it sucks) and last year I got all cramped and had to step out for a couple hours after the third lap.

Start drinking water early in the morning and eat bananas the day of the race. I always race solo and everytime at about 18 - 20 hours I start thinking things like "if I wipe out real bad I get to stop". It's a big mental game keeping that junk out of your head. When I get to that point I say to myself "I love single track mountain biking" And everytime I have to go up a big hill I think about the ride down on the other side. I would also say have good support. I tell all my family and friends what I'm doing and they just seem to stop by for a few hours here and there and the visits always overlap. Usually a group stops by at about ten and sits there and drinking and teasing me all night. "Dude just stop. Look at the tasty beer. mmmmm You know you want one."

Name: BALLISTIC WONDER
Email: THEGIOELIS@GREENCAFE.COM
Date: Wed, Jan 08, 2003, 23:10:55
Message:
WELL A GOOD DIET IS THE KEY! ALL THE POWER GEL CRAP AND ENERGY STUFF WILL NOT DO YOU ANY GOOD! TRUST ME. THINK ABOUT IT, HOW CAN U GIVE YOUR BODY MORE ENERGY? IF U DONT HAVE IT U DONT HAVE IT! HOW TO GET IT, DONT EAT MEAT, FRIED FOOD, OR SODA! TRY SPROUTS, FRESH FRUIT, WATER AND CARROT JUICE. IT WONT WORK OVER NIGHT BUT ESTABLISH A ROUTINE. U WILL HAVE ENERGY, AND LIVE LONGER. (SUGAR IS THE DEVIL)

Name: tim k
Email: nastradamious@hotmail.com
Date: Tue, Nov 05, 2002, 18:39:18
Message:
1. Eat good food
2. Findout how long the ride will be and try to ride that in a day
3. Get a good long sleep before that
4. have the right accessories
5. PACE YOURSELF

Name: TEC
Email: endure26@aol.com
Date: Tue, Sep 10, 2002, 10:02:17
Message:
1) Bike position: Bike fit is critical. You're going to hurt. However, you'll hurt a lot less if your bike fits properly. You may want to consider a higher bar/stem position (positive angle stem or riser bars) than normal as it will relieve some strain on the neck/back (especially if solo). Seat choice is also important. Make sure you do a few epic rides (five + hours) to validate your position.

2) Long rides: Nothing prepares you to go long like going long. This goes way beyond just the mental conditioning. Going long will help you determine what kind of foods work well for you, what digests for you, what your body craves. You can also accustomize yourself to religiously rehydrating over many hours.

3) Vaseline, Desitin, A&D oitments are divine. You will chaff in places you didn't know existed. It's better to find this out on an epic than to experience it on race day. Liberal applicantion of lubricants is highly recommended.

4) Don't forget your feet, to include shoe choice. You may experience some foot swelling (especially with a lot of hike and bike), so think about sizing. Socks or no socks is another consideration as well as pre-taping any problem areas or hot spots. Do some walking in your cycling shoes - make sure they're comfortable. Bring along an extra pair if you have them. Also include checking your cleats on your pre-race mech inspection. Loose or lost cleats suck.

5) Pack a race box with tools and plenty of spares. Tubes, tubes, tubes, brake shoes, derailleur and brake wires, spokes (correct size), a spare chain, an extra tire, a fork pump (to fit yours), extra bolts, a spare rear derailleur is nice if you have it (even if it's an old one - long as it's compatible). Most races have some mech/bike shop support, but it will cost you time and $$$ for the parts.

6) Clothing choice: Comfort. Try it first. Make sure the shorts fit and don't chaff. Think about weather extremes (hot and cold). Leg and arm warmers, long and short sleeve jerseys, jackets, vests, ear warmer/hat, gloves.

7) Ride at night. Ride technical trails at night. Become very familiar with your lights. Train with the lights you will use. Cycle your batteries. Make sure you will have battery support at the race for the type of lights you have or buy an extra. Use a bike mounted light as your primary (sink your money into this one first). Buy a helmet mounted light - even if it's one of the less expensive models not designed primarily for biking (i.e. Petzl type) - it will save you on switchbacks and technical stuff.

8) Above all -- RIDE!!! Ride really long. Ride in the A.M., ride in the P.M. When you finish riding really long - get back on your bike and ride some more.

9) Have fun. Suffering is inevitable, but as long as you keep a good attitude and try to make it fun, you'll suffer a lot less.

10) Final thought - start slow and taper - it's going to be a long day!

Name: Ron Castia
Email: zronn@attbi.com
Date: Wed, Aug 21, 2002, 11:16:49
Message:
In reading all the comments on Snow Shoe, I would say strip everything from your bike except for wheels and handlebars. Get the thing down to about 12 pounds. Now go out an buy the best trail running shoes you can find, and rig a backpack unit for the bike. Take your token bike an run for 15 miles a day with the bike strapped to your back.



Name: todd rutledge
Email: toddr@axs.net
Date: Mon, Aug 19, 2002, 15:49:13
Message:
Now now all of these suggestions are taken with a grain (mind you the largest guiness book size grain of salt there is) of salt. America what a wonderful place to live and breathe. I can't wait!! Now as far as Moab 24 with a 5 person team. What would be the recommended training camp with 8 weeks and counting?!

Name: Matt Mitchell
Email: mm11@Pressleyridgemail.org
Date: Tue, Jul 02, 2002, 13:06:02
Message:
The best way to train for Snowshoe is to train as if you were going to run a marathon, and ride hills. Don't worry about training for singletrack, because mother nature is never going to allow that course to be dry enough to ride it.
P.S.- Hay Granny, what have you done to piss off mother nature so much? No rain for two weeks until the Thursday before the race? What the F***!!!

Name: Joe Gower
Email: gnccracer@aol.com
Date: Thu, Jun 06, 2002, 15:33:38
Message:
It's really not an issue of training, so much as it's an issue of mental preparation. Having raced solo last year (and doing it again this year) I can attest to mental strength. Do alot of night rides, however, do it blindfolded, sort of like braille riding. Forget the long grueling training rides, go for a long run with a 23-pound backpack, and be sure to wear your lycra so all the locals can yell and scream at you as you run by. And definitely forget about carbo loading and Endurox, and healthy eating. Pepsi, spam, ramen, donuts and biscuits will keep you going better than anything else. Trust me on this one, my old roomates still make fun of my "diet." And above all, it's having fun that makes you go far and fast. And that's what it's all really about.

Name: Steve
Email: Truevelo1@hotmail.com
Date: Mon, May 20, 2002, 10:05:24
Message:
I think John Claman's post below says it all...I would simply add that you should ensure you get up in the middle of the nite, say 2 or 3 a.m. and ride right after a hard rain when conditions simulate Snowshoe perfectly. Do this two to three times a week...You can't go wrong! And as far as actually riding...find the longest hills in your area and ride them again and again and again...

Name: Scott
Email: scot_mags@yahoo.com
Date: Wed, Apr 24, 2002, 15:33:57
Message:
No need to train. Your all gonna die.

Name: PJ Henry
Email: henry_pj@acme.com
Date: Fri, Apr 19, 2002, 12:38:31
Message:
(For Snowshoe) Lots of good tips in here already. Guinness training...if you get in trouble during the 24 hours, Guiness WILL make you feel better. Riding on crappy trails; yes, kinda. I recommend not even using trails, just some nasty swampy sick terrain you literally CANNOT ride. put your bike on your shoulder and run for miles. make sure that mud comes up to your shins at points. this is not a joke. that is for the nasty sections of the race which is about half.
you should also climb, even on the road. there is a long section of double track where you will climb from the bottom of the mountain to the top, and yo ass will be tired--this after running through mud for 45 minutes. so go climb the hardest hills you can find, you can make up a lot of time here.
last but not least, YOU WILL LOSE MOTIVATION AND WANT TO DIE ON THE 3RD LAP. I saw god last year on lap 3 at 4am.
this is a mental race...think of the worst possible 24 hours of your life, then recognize this will be 10 times worse.


Name: Will Kern
Email: kernwill@yahoo.com
Date: Wed, Feb 13, 2002, 13:44:24
Message:
Is this course really 15 miles?

Name: Brad
Email: moonflowerexpeditions@yahoo.com
Date: Wed, Jan 23, 2002, 09:31:35
Message:
Assuming you switch riders every loop then you're only racing 15 miles at a time with a break in-between. So train for 15 miles increments with some subtle differences.
Start with a 15 mile loop in daylight, then progress to a night ride with lights, then a night ride without lights, then a single track night ride without lights and finally a winter (subfreezing), single-track, no-lights ride. At some point along the way you'll endo at 25mph and then you'll be ready! I'll see you there.

Name: Rx Solutions
Email: rxsolutions@attbi.com
Date: Mon, Jan 21, 2002, 20:56:55
Message:
You have to live and train in Moab! I can get you to Moab if you are a pharmacist and want to live and work in Moab. Rx Solutions is offering a $500 finders fee to anyone that refers us a pharmacist and is hired by my client. That is enough for a new helmet, shoes and a jersey for the next season.

Name: james hart
Email: jhart@houstonenergyinc.com
Date: Wed, Dec 12, 2001, 16:52:06
Message:
Ride, ride, and more ride. Then drink, ride, ride mo..ab ride.

Name: Hayden
Email: htarpley@suncompcs.net
Date: Thu, Nov 01, 2001, 23:53:55
Message:
I've been on a strick Guinness diet with the occassinal McDonald's 1/4 pounder thrown in. (Grease is good for a hang over) Then, after I've recovered from the hangover, I ride at nide. I feel that this best simulates how crappy you can feel without sleep and still riding.

Name: Eric
Email: Not Available
Date: Wed, Oct 10, 2001, 19:41:03
Message:
Who needs training? I plan on finishing dead last again!

Name: Federico
Email: fipogg@telcel.net.ve
Date: Mon, Sep 03, 2001, 12:07:24
Message:
Three months is good enough. At least take one full day to simulate the race going on and off your bike for about and hour and then rest for about three to four hours not less than three times. Hey, don't forget to include one night riding that day.

Name: Mick
Email: mswanson@cahners.com
Date: Wed, May 23, 2001, 16:51:17
Message:
Cracka

Any thoughts on how to train for Moab?

Name: Pam
Email: pmweller@yahoo.com
Date: Tue, May 22, 2001, 11:42:57
Message:
This will be my first 24-hour race. However....
Perhaps you could combine what Cracka said with this idea I have of getting up at like 2 or 3AM. Maybe it would prepare you mentally for what it feels like to get up at this hour and then ride in nasty conditions. In fact, if it's raining, this is even better. Am I right?

Name: Cracka
Email: crack@hotmail.com
Date: Tue, May 15, 2001, 09:38:13
Message:
Charge your lights, put them on....ride to your nastiest and most heinous trail in town or out of town...the nastier the better (this is snowshoe your training for) Now, ride in one direction untill your light burns out. when it is completely burt out, turn around and ride home. repeat 3 times per week. I definately reccommend Jon Claman's ideas for training as well.

Name: alex
Email: Not Available
Date: Sun, May 13, 2001, 17:50:12
Message:
go to www.bicycling.com
and go to the training section
they have a 12 week fitness plan for 24 hour races


Name: dave
Email: david2600@hotmail.com
Date: Mon, Apr 23, 2001, 21:51:59
Message:
Run. Most riders, will end up walking a good bit of the course, that is a fact. As a strong runner, you can make up a LOT of time as the others struggle, fall and end up walking anyway. Very few riders, if any were able to ride the entire course last year. Ride hard when you can, run hard when you must.

Name: John Claman
Email: jclaman@nrahq.org
Date: Mon, Apr 16, 2001, 11:48:45
Message:
For riding snowshoe, try to find the most rocky, rooty, nasty trail in your area (i recommend the Orange trail from signal knob to Elizabeth Furnace, near Front Royal, VA)
If you don't have access to one, you can create your own. here's how: get a truck load of cinder blocks, a yard of fire wood, 25 bags of mulch (to set the mood) spread this out in a 2 foot wide strip as far as it wiil go. throw in several bags of fresh cut grass for good measure and hose it all down to a muddy, soupy, rocky inconsistency. ride this new trail as fast and as hard as you can, back and forth, several times a day. if you find that you're staying upright on your bike and not falling off, then practice diving from your bike, aiming for the sharpest parts of the section. try this while holding onto the bars, or by staying clipped in to one pedal, it's important to vary one's training. A final note: if you find you're getting to much traction and not slipping enough, strip all of the bark off of the wood and rub vegetable oil on the exposed areas. Keep riding and in no time you'll be ready for Snowshoe. happy trails!

Name: Devian Gilbert
Email: dgmtry@ix.netcom.com
Date: Thu, Mar 15, 2001, 18:09:59
Message:
30+ hours/week on the bike. Ride at night, climbing single track.

Name: Lucas Chandler
Email: Xcbiker409@Aol.com
Date: Thu, Feb 08, 2001, 21:09:21
Message:
Ride hard

Name: Don Parks
Email: parksd@iPlayOutside.com
Date: Wed, Feb 07, 2001, 17:52:35
Message:
Plenty of sleep deprivation training...
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